MMU Research and Knowledge Exchange Blog

Funding opportunities, news and guidance from RKE at Manchester Metropolitan University


Leave a comment

Today’s Tenders

Take a look at this Tender opportunity for funding in Knowledge Exchange activities. Please pass these on to any colleagues you feel may also be interested. For more information on any opportunity listed, please contact rketenders@mmu.ac.uk

Research to support an inquiry into young people’s future health prospects

The Health Foundation are commissioning research  to further the understanding of factors that shape young people’s future health prospects to inform a Health Foundation inquiry into this topic. The project requires a research partner with a track record of high quality policy and practice research in the field of young people (specifically between the ages of 12 and 24 years old and transitions to adulthood). The intention is to produce a quantitative picture of the factors that contribute to today’s young people having healthy lives, now and in the future and recommendations on the actions necessary to improve future health prospects.

An information call will be held on Wednesday 17 May 2017.

Deadline: 5 June

Funding Available: £180,000


Leave a comment

NERC: Call for Ideas for Strategic Research

NERC invites researchers and those who use environmental science research to submit ideas for scientific advances that will, over time, contribute to addressing some of these major challenges of the 21st century. The ideas will be used to inform the development of new strategic research investments through either highlight topics or strategic programme areas.

Deadline for HT ideas: 16 May 2017

For more information on submitting, please visit NERC.


Leave a comment

Consultation for UK Industrial Strategy Fund: Healthy Ageing

Innovate UK, in conjunction with the Research Councils and the Knowledge Transfer Network, will conduct a series of public workshop events w/c 19th June and w/c 26th June 2017.

The series of three events will take place around Newcastle upon Tyne, Birmingham and London with a focus on Healthy Ageing. The workshops will help define themes that will build upon UK capabilities which will address and benefit from on-going demographic change both here and globally and will deliver economic growth.

Please note these two weeks in your diaries. Further information will be made available after 8th June.


2 Comments

Are you interested in the British Academy/Leverhulme Small Grant? Drop- in session for any questions on 3rd May

British Academy Leverhulme-Trust1-300x168

RKE are holding a drop-in session  on Weds 3rd May, 1-2pm, for anyone considering an application to the British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grant scheme – deadline 24th May.

We’ll be in GM224 in Geoffrey Manton for that hour, available to answer any quick questions you might have, share examples of successful applications and demonstrate the egap application system, so please do call in.

These awards are up to £10,000 in value, tenable for up to 24 months, and are intended  to cover the cost of expenses arising from a defined research project in the humanities or social sciences.

(Note: all external grant applications need a full economic costing completing and approved by your Faculty so please do contact your Research Development Manager for assistance).

http://www.britac.ac.uk/ba-leverhulme-small-research-grants

 

 

 

 


Leave a comment

H2020: MSCA Individual Fellowships Information Event – reminder

Horizon%202020

For those of you interested in the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions “Individual Fellowships”, we will be holding an event on 23 May 2017, from 2.00-4.00 pm where you can find out more and also hear about Dr Emma Hodson-Tole’s experiences of securing funding from the scheme. If you are interested in attending please register here by 10 May 2017 – we have limited places available, so book early to avoid disappointment!

Unfortunately, attendance is restricted to our Manchester Met-based subscribers, but those of you based at different institutions may be interested in the events being run by UK Research Office.

About the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions “Individual Fellowships”

The scheme provides fully funded fellowships of up to 24 months for researchers to come to Manchester Met from any country other than the UK. They can be working in any discipline and together with colleagues at Manchester Met, they can build their own programme of research in any field. The application is made jointly between the prospective fellow and Manchester Met and does not require a large partnership.

The next deadline is 14 September 2017.

(* even if they don’t have their PhD, if they have four years full time research experience they also qualify) 


Leave a comment

Pre-announcement: ESRC-ICSSR call for collaborative research on urban transformations in India

ESRC    The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR) are pleased to pre-announce a joint call for collaborative projects between UK and Indian researchers. Projects will seek to enhance understanding of urban challenges and issues in India and achieve economic and social impact in India.

In order to refine the scope of the call and prioritise limited funding on the most pressing issues, the ESRC, ICSSR and RCUK (Research Councils UK) organised a workshop with academics representing institutions from across the UK and India in March 2016. Participants took part in a range of activities and discussions in order to establish key issues which would benefit from UK/India collaborative research under the Newton Fund.

The call is expected to open shortly, at which point a full specification and further information on the relevant dates will be provided.

Themes that are expected to be encouraged include:

  • urban planning, governance and management
  • formal and informal populations
  • place and space: challenges and solutions
  • health, sanitation and labour issues
  • small towns and dynamics of changes.

The ESRC has allocated up to £1.75 million, with matched resources from ICSSR. It is expected that four to six research projects will be awarded under this call.

Please see our funding opportunities for updates on this call as they become available.

UK awards will be funded through the Newton Fund – a five year programme that aims to strengthen research and innovation partnerships between the UK and emerging knowledge economies.

http://www.esrc.ac.uk/news-events-and-publications/news/news-items/pre-announcement-esrc-icssr-call-for-collaborative-research-on-urban-transformations-in-india/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

 


Leave a comment

Thoughts and advice from a Newton Fund panel reviewer

Dr Adam Taylor, Director of the Clinical Anatomy Learning Centre & Senior Lecturer in Anatomy, Lancaster University, shares what the British Council panel reviewers look for in applications to the Newton Fund.

As researchers, we’ve all been at meetings/conferences and met people who would be interesting collaborators, but for a variety of reasons it just isn’t feasible; costs, distance, or just an appropriate funding stream that provides the opportunity. The Newton Fund presents these opportunities, to engage in research and build long term collaborative links that benefit all involved, with the ultimate goal of aiding those most in need in developing countries.

As a reviewer for the British Council on their biomed review panel, I wanted to share my thoughts and insights which hopefully provide practical advice to those thinking of applying.

WHAT ARE THE REVIEWERS LOOKING FOR?

It varies, however there are some common themes that appear throughout which I will attempt to summarise here.

  1. Who benefits from the project? Is it relevant to economic development and social welfare?The underlying aim of the Newton Fund is to support research that has the ability to lead to a positive impact on the lives of people on low incomes, and contribute to the economic development and social welfare of the partner country in a reasonable timeframe.This criteria is potentially one of the weakest areas that applicants score in, either because it is not clearly articulated in their application how they are going to do this, or they just don’t articulate it at all.As reviewers we are realistic about the science and research contained in the application, and we don’t expect that they will right all of the existing problems overnight. However, a plausible pathway will contain details that suggest that both the UK and partner country applicants have a clear understanding of the size of the problem that they are trying to address, and how their research and results will lead to change and improvements. Again, “realistically” is the keyword, the timeframe for these benefits to work their way through this is 3-15 years.
  2. Strength of the partnership Following on from this we look at the partnership in the application, and whether this represents a viable match to accomplish what is proposed.  Partnerships can be the commencement of a new collaboration all together, or they can build from an existing collaboration, in which case they must clearly further existing links. Partnerships must also be a logical match; one side might have the technical expertise, and the other the access to data, samples or resources to be analysed.
  3. Project design and budgets As ever, a clear study design and timeline of what is expected to be achieved always helps! Where appropriate a clear budget and costing will help add weight to the project you are proposing, and show whether the outputs and objectives are realistic. Any offer of in-kind or matched funding is always welcome. This can be institutionally or from third parties, and just needs to be clearly articulated, particularly in the case of what the third party is bringing to the research.
  4. Institutional supportThere has to be support from both the UK and partner-country institutions for the project and the individual involved. Some applications detail what resources the institutions will make available and how they will help the applicants achieve the objectives – this is welcome.
  5. Capacity building and sustainabilityAlthough they may sound vague, ‘capacity and sustainability building’ are key strategic requirements of the Newton Fund. Reviewers look for clear descriptors of how this initial funding will sustain their collaboration over the longer term, beyond the initial grant period.Linked to this is the development of individuals involved; what does the individual gain and how will this be of benefit to them? And, how are others going to benefit in the longer term? This may be as simple as the learning and utilisation of new techniques to aid in front line diagnosis of a common disease found in the partner country. Longer term, this knowledge may then help to quickly diagnose many people who will then be in a position to contribute economically to the country. There are many ways that this capacity building and sustainability may appear, but it is fundamental that they are clearly articulated.

The full article can be assessed on the British Council Website https://www.britishcouncil.org/education/science/newton/reviewer-perspective-blog