MMU Research and Knowledge Exchange Blog

Funding opportunities, news and guidance from RKE at Manchester Met


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Invitation: AHRC visit to ManMet for Global Challenges info session, Jan 2020

ahrc new logo Gary Grubb

We are pleased to invite ManMet colleagues to a half-day visit by Gary Grubb, Associate Director at the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

Gary’s remit includes interdisciplinary and cross-Council research and his current area of focus is AHRC’s ‘global activities’ including the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) which he will be concentrating on for this visit.

The event is open to all our researchers interested in UKRI’s Global Challenges work but especially those working within the AHRC’s arts and humanities remit.

Date: Friday 10th January 2020

Location:  BR 2.17,  Brooks Building

Programme:

10 -11am Gary Grubb presentation on ‘AHRC’s global activities’

This will focus on AHRC’s interests and opportunities in GCRF and particularly their take on the role of arts and humanities research within the GCRF programme. Gary will also range into broader UKRI GCRF / ODA activities and talk about research policy issues in this space that cut across Councils / UKRI.

11 – 11:15 Break

11:15 – 12:15 ManMet Showcase.

4 x 15 mins presentations from our academics sharing their GCRF related research

12:15 – 1pm Q&A

A panel consisting of Gary Grubb, Professor Kate Pahl and other ManMet staff with GCRF experience (e.g. reviewers and panel members and reviewers) will discuss audience questions.

This is a two-way dialogue and an opportunity for participants give feedback and share ideas with Gary to take back to the AHRC/UKRI.

Topics could include:

– Practical issues such as equitable partnerships and ethics

– Areas of future focus

– How arts and humanities research fits within interdisciplinary work in this area

– Colleagues experiences of being involved in GCRF research

PLEASE BOOK VIA EVENT BRITE HERE:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/talk-by-gary-grubb-of-the-ahrc-tickets-79190692493?aff=utm_source%3Deb_email%26utm_medium%3Demail%26utm_campaign%3Dnew_event_email&utm_term=eventurl_text

 


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Want to be nominated for the AHRC Peer Review College? Reminder: your EOIs by 20th Sep

AHRC 2   Just a reminder that if anyone is interested in being nominated to join the AHRC’s Peer Review College, there is an internal deadline for your EOIs – this Friday, 20th September.

The AHRC have an open call for new members of their PRC College in all areas – Academic Reviewers, International Reviewers, Strategic Reviewers, KE Reviewers and Early Career.

PRC members provide expert quality reviews of applications within their areas of expertise, which inform the AHRC’s decision making processes. Members can also be called upon to sit on assessment or moderation panels. As well as making an important contribution to the AHRC’s peer review processes, the experience gained by membership of the College provides benefits to individuals, departments and higher education institutions.

Emails with instructions on submitting an EOI will have come Professor Berthold Schoene for Faculty of Arts & Humanities and the Faculty Research Office for Education.


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Pre-Call notification: SOLSTICE Enabling Societal Transformation in the Face of Climate Change

SOLSTICE seeks interdisciplinary contributions from consortia led by Social Sciences and Humanities who will address societal aspects of climate change. Given the pressing nature of global climate change, SOLSTICE aims at producing knowledge that can have an impact on society and policy; impact should not be limited to scientific publications, but should have the potential to trigger change in behavior and attitudes at any level of society.

The call will address three themes:

  • Social justice and participation
  • Sense making, cultural meaning and risk perception
  • Transformative finance and economy

The rationale of this call can be found in the JPI Climate White Paper “Operationalizing knowledge on and for societal transformation in the face of climate change”.

This call also seeks to attract scientists who work in disciplines that are typically not associated with climate change research in order to develop innovative approaches and combinations of disciplines.

Consortia should consist of scientists from at least three participating countries.

The following countries are interested in participating in this call: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Norway, United Kingdom

The list of participating countries is not final and may be subject to change until the official call announcement 5 October 2019. The submission deadline is foreseen for 9 January 2020.  Please note that call announcement and submission deadline dates are not confirmed and may be subject to change

http://www.jpi-climate.eu/news-events/news/10899264/Call-pre-announcement-SOLSTICE-Enabling-Societal-Transformation-in-the-Face-of-Climate-Change

 


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ARMA 2019

Last month RKE Research Development Officers, Rachel Colley and Becky Hewlett, attended with annual ARMA conference in Belfast. ARMA is the Association of Research Managers and Administrators and the conference is a way of colleagues across the sector, and across the country, to get together and share best practices, build new networks and get informed about the current and future research landscape.


Alongside Alison Lloyd, Research Ethics and Governance Manger, and Justine Daniels, Director of Research and Knowledge Exchange, the team attended a number of sessions and plenaries – and even held some of our own! – over the two days.

As a way of sharing some of the knowledge picked up in those sessions the Research Development Officers have put together a Sway, and a short YouTube video, presenting just some of the team’s experiences.

SWAY


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British Academy Funding Call: Knowledge Frontiers – International Interdisciplinary Research

The British Academy is inviting proposals from UK-based researchers in the humanities and social sciences wishing to develop international interdisciplinary projects in collaboration with colleagues from the natural, engineering and / or medical sciences, with a focus on hazard and risk, cultures of forecasting, and the meaning of resilience.

Aims

The purpose of each project will be to develop new international research ideas. Projects will need to also demonstrate an innovative and interdisciplinary partnership. The Academy is looking to fund applications that break new ground in the collaborations – international and interdisciplinary – they support and the research they aim to undertake. The Academy particularly encourages applications led by scholars in the humanities.

Eligibility Requirements

The lead applicant must be a researcher from the humanities and social sciences, and be based at an eligible UK university or research institute. They must be of postdoctoral or above status (or have equivalent research experience). Projects must involve at least one co-applicant from the natural, engineering and / or medical sciences. Collaboration between researchers in different institutions is encouraged, where appropriate, given the nature and aims of the programme, and applications may include co-applicants and other participants from overseas. 

Value and Duration

The Academy offers awards of up to £200,000 for 24 months in duration with Full Economic Costing at 100%. Projects must begin on 1 April 2020 and finish on 31 March 2022.

Please contact researchapplications@mmu.ac.uk if you are interested in applying to this scheme or wish to know more.


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Thinking of a Nuffield Foundation bid? Tips from an a grant winner

Nuffield Foundation Logo  Research Professional

This article is taken from Research Professional’s Research Insight service and Research Fortnight so thanks to them.

Partnerships and impact should be at the base of a Nuffield Foundation bid

Nuffield Foundation Grants for Research, Development and Analysis support projects that improve the design and operation of social policy, especially in education, welfare and justice.

Grants range from £10,000 to £500,000, but most are worth between £50,000 and £300,000. The foundation has said it expects the deadline for outline applications to the next round to be in September.

Here, Gráinne McKeever, a professor of law and social justice at Ulster University, speaks about her 2016 Nuffield grants for studying litigants in person: people who represent themselves in the Northern Ireland court system.

What was the background to your bid? I had just completed a pilot project on the topic funded by the British Academy and Leverhulme Small Research Grants scheme. Around that time, the Department of Justice in Northern Ireland published a major review of access to justice, which highlighted the need for more research on the position of litigants in person. The policy context coincided perfectly with the direction of my research.

What attracted you to Nuffield? It had previously funded tribunal reform research I had done for the Law Centre in Northern Ireland, so I knew it was interested in how the legal system works for ordinary people and how the values of the legal system play out. It was also clear that it would fund research on Northern Ireland as one of the jurisdictions in the UK—you can’t assume this with all funders.

What’s more, the application process is a tailored, staged system. It’s not one of those processes where you leap in, do eight weeks of work on a massive application and then you either get it or not. It’s more manageable.

Was there a fit with Nuffield’s priorities? Yes. The type of research we were proposing had the potential to generate evidence-based reform. We knew Nuffield was not a funder for blue-sky research—it wants to make a difference on the ground.

Did you consider any other funders? Not seriously. The Nuffield Foundation was our first port of call. I’ve done some work for the Legal Education Foundation in the past, who are also good to work with. If we hadn’t been successful with Nuffield, we might have approached them.

Did you work with any partner organisations? It was a joint bid with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and largely thanks to that, I knew that the stakeholder engagement section was going to be strong. Together with the chief commissioner of the Human Rights Commission I met the lord chief justice, the head of the Department of Justice of Northern Ireland and the head of the Northern Ireland Courts and Tribunals Service, to see if they would facilitate the research if we got the grant. Getting their buy-in at an early stage was essential.

What is the first stage of the application process? Applicants submit a brief outline application, which is an opportunity to refine your thinking to identify a good research idea and start to set out how it might be delivered. Nuffield gave us feedback at that stage saying, “We think you could do more on this and for that reason we think your budget might not be sufficient.”

It’s not my experience that a funder will come back and say you need to ask them for more money, but they were keen to make sure we maximised the project’s potential.

What elements did you bring to the fore in the full application? While some funders may be more interested in developing an in-depth theoretical understanding of an issue, Nuffield is more interested in improving society. So that was an important part of our application. In particular, we were keen to emphasise the value that the Human Rights Commission would bring to the project. They provided a legal advice clinic that as academics we wouldn’t have been able to do in the same way.

Do you have any tips for future applicants? Remember that Nuffield wants to make a difference. Impact planning really is intrinsic to the research that Nuffield has funded for us. We didn’t just do it to get a grant and produce a report. We did it because we could see very clearly that there was a chance to make a difference.

What else is Nuffield looking for? Another important aspect is partnership working. Our project has just been extended through another major grant from Nuffield and we’re now going to be working with the Northern Ireland Courts and Tribunals Service and others to provide support materials for personal litigants in family law cases.

For Nuffield, partnership is not just about working with an organisation to get their ideas. Being able to engage with an organisation on the ground that can sustain and add greater value to the research is something Nuffield has been very keen for us to do.

It’s also important to engage seriously with the feedback. Talk to people who have done other work in your area and get their feedback on your draft application.

https://www.researchprofessional.com/0/rr/news/uk/careers/2019/6/Firm-foundations.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=rpMailing&utm_campaign=researchFortnightNews_2019-06-26