MMU Research and Knowledge Exchange Blog

Funding opportunities, news and guidance from RKE at Manchester Met


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Pre-Call notification: SOLSTICE Enabling Societal Transformation in the Face of Climate Change

SOLSTICE seeks interdisciplinary contributions from consortia led by Social Sciences and Humanities who will address societal aspects of climate change. Given the pressing nature of global climate change, SOLSTICE aims at producing knowledge that can have an impact on society and policy; impact should not be limited to scientific publications, but should have the potential to trigger change in behavior and attitudes at any level of society.

The call will address three themes:

  • Social justice and participation
  • Sense making, cultural meaning and risk perception
  • Transformative finance and economy

The rationale of this call can be found in the JPI Climate White Paper “Operationalizing knowledge on and for societal transformation in the face of climate change”.

This call also seeks to attract scientists who work in disciplines that are typically not associated with climate change research in order to develop innovative approaches and combinations of disciplines.

Consortia should consist of scientists from at least three participating countries.

The following countries are interested in participating in this call: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Norway, United Kingdom

The list of participating countries is not final and may be subject to change until the official call announcement 5 October 2019. The submission deadline is foreseen for 9 January 2020.  Please note that call announcement and submission deadline dates are not confirmed and may be subject to change

http://www.jpi-climate.eu/news-events/news/10899264/Call-pre-announcement-SOLSTICE-Enabling-Societal-Transformation-in-the-Face-of-Climate-Change

 


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ARMA 2019

Last month RKE Research Development Officers, Rachel Colley and Becky Hewlett, attended with annual ARMA conference in Belfast. ARMA is the Association of Research Managers and Administrators and the conference is a way of colleagues across the sector, and across the country, to get together and share best practices, build new networks and get informed about the current and future research landscape.


Alongside Alison Lloyd, Research Ethics and Governance Manger, and Justine Daniels, Director of Research and Knowledge Exchange, the team attended a number of sessions and plenaries – and even held some of our own! – over the two days.

As a way of sharing some of the knowledge picked up in those sessions the Research Development Officers have put together a Sway, and a short YouTube video, presenting just some of the team’s experiences.

SWAY


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British Academy Funding Call: Knowledge Frontiers – International Interdisciplinary Research

The British Academy is inviting proposals from UK-based researchers in the humanities and social sciences wishing to develop international interdisciplinary projects in collaboration with colleagues from the natural, engineering and / or medical sciences, with a focus on hazard and risk, cultures of forecasting, and the meaning of resilience.

Aims

The purpose of each project will be to develop new international research ideas. Projects will need to also demonstrate an innovative and interdisciplinary partnership. The Academy is looking to fund applications that break new ground in the collaborations – international and interdisciplinary – they support and the research they aim to undertake. The Academy particularly encourages applications led by scholars in the humanities.

Eligibility Requirements

The lead applicant must be a researcher from the humanities and social sciences, and be based at an eligible UK university or research institute. They must be of postdoctoral or above status (or have equivalent research experience). Projects must involve at least one co-applicant from the natural, engineering and / or medical sciences. Collaboration between researchers in different institutions is encouraged, where appropriate, given the nature and aims of the programme, and applications may include co-applicants and other participants from overseas. 

Value and Duration

The Academy offers awards of up to £200,000 for 24 months in duration with Full Economic Costing at 100%. Projects must begin on 1 April 2020 and finish on 31 March 2022.

Please contact researchapplications@mmu.ac.uk if you are interested in applying to this scheme or wish to know more.


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Thinking of a Nuffield Foundation bid? Tips from an a grant winner

Nuffield Foundation Logo  Research Professional

This article is taken from Research Professional’s Research Insight service and Research Fortnight so thanks to them.

Partnerships and impact should be at the base of a Nuffield Foundation bid

Nuffield Foundation Grants for Research, Development and Analysis support projects that improve the design and operation of social policy, especially in education, welfare and justice.

Grants range from £10,000 to £500,000, but most are worth between £50,000 and £300,000. The foundation has said it expects the deadline for outline applications to the next round to be in September.

Here, Gráinne McKeever, a professor of law and social justice at Ulster University, speaks about her 2016 Nuffield grants for studying litigants in person: people who represent themselves in the Northern Ireland court system.

What was the background to your bid? I had just completed a pilot project on the topic funded by the British Academy and Leverhulme Small Research Grants scheme. Around that time, the Department of Justice in Northern Ireland published a major review of access to justice, which highlighted the need for more research on the position of litigants in person. The policy context coincided perfectly with the direction of my research.

What attracted you to Nuffield? It had previously funded tribunal reform research I had done for the Law Centre in Northern Ireland, so I knew it was interested in how the legal system works for ordinary people and how the values of the legal system play out. It was also clear that it would fund research on Northern Ireland as one of the jurisdictions in the UK—you can’t assume this with all funders.

What’s more, the application process is a tailored, staged system. It’s not one of those processes where you leap in, do eight weeks of work on a massive application and then you either get it or not. It’s more manageable.

Was there a fit with Nuffield’s priorities? Yes. The type of research we were proposing had the potential to generate evidence-based reform. We knew Nuffield was not a funder for blue-sky research—it wants to make a difference on the ground.

Did you consider any other funders? Not seriously. The Nuffield Foundation was our first port of call. I’ve done some work for the Legal Education Foundation in the past, who are also good to work with. If we hadn’t been successful with Nuffield, we might have approached them.

Did you work with any partner organisations? It was a joint bid with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and largely thanks to that, I knew that the stakeholder engagement section was going to be strong. Together with the chief commissioner of the Human Rights Commission I met the lord chief justice, the head of the Department of Justice of Northern Ireland and the head of the Northern Ireland Courts and Tribunals Service, to see if they would facilitate the research if we got the grant. Getting their buy-in at an early stage was essential.

What is the first stage of the application process? Applicants submit a brief outline application, which is an opportunity to refine your thinking to identify a good research idea and start to set out how it might be delivered. Nuffield gave us feedback at that stage saying, “We think you could do more on this and for that reason we think your budget might not be sufficient.”

It’s not my experience that a funder will come back and say you need to ask them for more money, but they were keen to make sure we maximised the project’s potential.

What elements did you bring to the fore in the full application? While some funders may be more interested in developing an in-depth theoretical understanding of an issue, Nuffield is more interested in improving society. So that was an important part of our application. In particular, we were keen to emphasise the value that the Human Rights Commission would bring to the project. They provided a legal advice clinic that as academics we wouldn’t have been able to do in the same way.

Do you have any tips for future applicants? Remember that Nuffield wants to make a difference. Impact planning really is intrinsic to the research that Nuffield has funded for us. We didn’t just do it to get a grant and produce a report. We did it because we could see very clearly that there was a chance to make a difference.

What else is Nuffield looking for? Another important aspect is partnership working. Our project has just been extended through another major grant from Nuffield and we’re now going to be working with the Northern Ireland Courts and Tribunals Service and others to provide support materials for personal litigants in family law cases.

For Nuffield, partnership is not just about working with an organisation to get their ideas. Being able to engage with an organisation on the ground that can sustain and add greater value to the research is something Nuffield has been very keen for us to do.

It’s also important to engage seriously with the feedback. Talk to people who have done other work in your area and get their feedback on your draft application.

https://www.researchprofessional.com/0/rr/news/uk/careers/2019/6/Firm-foundations.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=rpMailing&utm_campaign=researchFortnightNews_2019-06-26


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Pre-call announcement from Joint Programming Initiative in Cultural Heritage and Global Change (JPICH): Conservation & Protection

The Joint Programming Initiative in Cultural Heritage and Global Change (JPICH) is pleased to announce a new funding opportunity for transnational proposals. The Conservation and Protection call will support research into strategies, methodologies and tools to safeguard and use the physical components of our cultural heritage. It invites research projects that take a global approach to preserving Europe’s heritage and which result in a better understanding of our history, traditions and culture, of our individual and collective identities, and ultimately of our well-being. The total budget for the call for transnational projects is approximately 6.96 million Euros. The participating countries in this call are: Belarus, Cyprus, Czech Republic, France, Italy, Latvia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, The Netherlands, The United Kingdom.

The main eligibility criteria are:

• Duration of projects: up to 36 months;

• Each project proposal must comprise of at least three research teams, each based in an eligible institution in a different country participating in the Conservation and Protection Call. The maximum number of research teams in a project proposal is five.

• Applications must be in accordance with the eligibility requirements relevant for the national research teams in the transnational research consortia and not exceed the maximum budgets to be requested therein.  For the UK that means we follow the AHRC rules.

The Call for Proposals will open on Wednesday 1st May 2019 and the deadline for submission of proposals will be  Sunday 30 June 2019, 14:00 CEST.

A JISC Mail list has been set up to help researchers or interested partners to find partners in other countries and organisations for the JPICH Conservation and Protection Call. To use this service, you need to subscribe at the following link: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/JPICH-CONSERVATIONCALL

For further info please see the PDF available here: https://ahrc.ukri.org/funding/apply-for-funding/current-opportunities/jpich-conservation-and-protection-pre-call-announcement/

 


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Wellcome: it’s not just for health and biomedical researchers.

If you thought that Wellcome was a funder only for biomedical and health researchers, think again.

Although Wellcome is primarily known as a funder of biomedical research, it has always provided funding for bioethics and history of medicine projects. About five years ago the trust expanded its remit in this area, and it now spends more than £30 million a year on a wide range of humanities and social science projects that are relevant to health or biomedical research. In the past Wellcome have supported a huge range of disciplines that include anthropology, economics, geography, law, literature, philosophy, political economy, political science, science and technology studies and sociology.

Vector of a light bulb doodle

What kind of schemes do Wellcome offer?

The bulk of their funding is offered through open or responsive-mode schemes, although they do occasionally have themed calls. They range from small grants and seed awards, to fellowships, investigator awards and large collaborative grants.

Have a look at what they have on at the moment by following this link.

So what makes a good Wellcome proposal?

They’re looking for something ambitious but feasible. As an independent foundation they are able to support research that might not fit elsewhere, and in contrast to public funders, they’re less interested on research being applied or having a defined impact. In fact, a project that appears fixed on, say, trialling an intervention is less likely to be supported. That said, they want to fund work that has the potential to have relevance in the real world. They are interested in the research they support to offer a theoretical contribution, even if it’s mainly empirical in natural and/or has applied elements.

You can read the full article on Research Professional by following this link.

If you’re interested in learning more about Wellcome, head to their website for more information. The schemes however are competitive and RKE will often engage in a conversation with the funder around project suitability prior to beginning your application, so we would always encourage you to contact your Research Development Manager or Officer before moving forward with any research ideas. You can contact RKE at researchapplications@mmu.ac.uk.