MMU Research and Knowledge Exchange Blog

Funding opportunities, news and guidance from RKE at Manchester Met


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Thinking of a Nuffield Foundation bid? Tips from an a grant winner

Nuffield Foundation Logo  Research Professional

This article is taken from Research Professional’s Research Insight service and Research Fortnight so thanks to them.

Partnerships and impact should be at the base of a Nuffield Foundation bid

Nuffield Foundation Grants for Research, Development and Analysis support projects that improve the design and operation of social policy, especially in education, welfare and justice.

Grants range from £10,000 to £500,000, but most are worth between £50,000 and £300,000. The foundation has said it expects the deadline for outline applications to the next round to be in September.

Here, Gráinne McKeever, a professor of law and social justice at Ulster University, speaks about her 2016 Nuffield grants for studying litigants in person: people who represent themselves in the Northern Ireland court system.

What was the background to your bid? I had just completed a pilot project on the topic funded by the British Academy and Leverhulme Small Research Grants scheme. Around that time, the Department of Justice in Northern Ireland published a major review of access to justice, which highlighted the need for more research on the position of litigants in person. The policy context coincided perfectly with the direction of my research.

What attracted you to Nuffield? It had previously funded tribunal reform research I had done for the Law Centre in Northern Ireland, so I knew it was interested in how the legal system works for ordinary people and how the values of the legal system play out. It was also clear that it would fund research on Northern Ireland as one of the jurisdictions in the UK—you can’t assume this with all funders.

What’s more, the application process is a tailored, staged system. It’s not one of those processes where you leap in, do eight weeks of work on a massive application and then you either get it or not. It’s more manageable.

Was there a fit with Nuffield’s priorities? Yes. The type of research we were proposing had the potential to generate evidence-based reform. We knew Nuffield was not a funder for blue-sky research—it wants to make a difference on the ground.

Did you consider any other funders? Not seriously. The Nuffield Foundation was our first port of call. I’ve done some work for the Legal Education Foundation in the past, who are also good to work with. If we hadn’t been successful with Nuffield, we might have approached them.

Did you work with any partner organisations? It was a joint bid with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and largely thanks to that, I knew that the stakeholder engagement section was going to be strong. Together with the chief commissioner of the Human Rights Commission I met the lord chief justice, the head of the Department of Justice of Northern Ireland and the head of the Northern Ireland Courts and Tribunals Service, to see if they would facilitate the research if we got the grant. Getting their buy-in at an early stage was essential.

What is the first stage of the application process? Applicants submit a brief outline application, which is an opportunity to refine your thinking to identify a good research idea and start to set out how it might be delivered. Nuffield gave us feedback at that stage saying, “We think you could do more on this and for that reason we think your budget might not be sufficient.”

It’s not my experience that a funder will come back and say you need to ask them for more money, but they were keen to make sure we maximised the project’s potential.

What elements did you bring to the fore in the full application? While some funders may be more interested in developing an in-depth theoretical understanding of an issue, Nuffield is more interested in improving society. So that was an important part of our application. In particular, we were keen to emphasise the value that the Human Rights Commission would bring to the project. They provided a legal advice clinic that as academics we wouldn’t have been able to do in the same way.

Do you have any tips for future applicants? Remember that Nuffield wants to make a difference. Impact planning really is intrinsic to the research that Nuffield has funded for us. We didn’t just do it to get a grant and produce a report. We did it because we could see very clearly that there was a chance to make a difference.

What else is Nuffield looking for? Another important aspect is partnership working. Our project has just been extended through another major grant from Nuffield and we’re now going to be working with the Northern Ireland Courts and Tribunals Service and others to provide support materials for personal litigants in family law cases.

For Nuffield, partnership is not just about working with an organisation to get their ideas. Being able to engage with an organisation on the ground that can sustain and add greater value to the research is something Nuffield has been very keen for us to do.

It’s also important to engage seriously with the feedback. Talk to people who have done other work in your area and get their feedback on your draft application.

https://www.researchprofessional.com/0/rr/news/uk/careers/2019/6/Firm-foundations.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=rpMailing&utm_campaign=researchFortnightNews_2019-06-26


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The Year Ahead for Biomedical Science & Biotechnology

A version of this article first appeared on Research Professional 04/01/2019.  

biomedical science

The long-term NHS plan is expected to be published within the next month with medical charities, and medical research organisations hoping it will make it easier for clinicians to conduct research. Meanwhile Industry and Government will start to implement the second life sciences sector deal, including the £1.3 billion investment in UK life sciences.

The Nuffield Council for Bioethics will be replacing members of their council, as their terms come to an end – you have until 28th January to apply (have a look here!). Towards the end of the year they will also be publishing a report on the ethical challenges of global health emergencies.

The MRC will be hiring a clinical director and along with the other eight bodies of UKRI will publish their first strategic delivery plans by the spring.

The Wellcome Trust have updated their priority areas – more to follow on this.

The Academy of Medical Sciences is expected to announce their first cohort of “future leaders” this month for their FLIER leadership programme. They will also be hosting a UK-India antimicrobial resistance symposium in February.

The NHS are hoping to sequence 1 million whole genomes in fives years and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics will be exploring the ethical issues with genome editing farmed animals.


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New Musculoskeletal Funding from Nuffield Foundation

The Nuffield Foundation is launching calls from research into musculoskeletal conditions with a dedicated fund of £12.5m over the next 10 years, with £6.25m to be awarded in the first 5 years.

There are three different programmes available:

  • Research to exploit existing national-level longitudinal and administrative data on the bio/social/economic determinants and outcomes of musculoskeletal conditions through secondary analysis of existing data.
  • Research to integrate and exploit local health, social care and other data sources in the UK at a local-level through funding one or more local data integration pilot sites. It is anticipated that this will be funded in partnership with Versus Arthritis.
  • Interdisciplinary research into musculoskeletal conditions that will generate new knowledge on health and social wellbeing for those living with musculoskeletal conditions.

Award Amount: Funding is available for projects between £10,000 – £500,000 with most projects expected to be in the £50,000 – £300,000 range.

Deadline: Intent to submit forms need to be submitted by 10th January 2019 with the outline proposal submitted by 28th January 2019.

For more information on the scheme please visit the Nuffield Foundation Website. If you’d like to apply then please get in touch with your Research Development Team.


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Nuffield Research Placements – Supervisors Needed

Providing a Nuffield Research Placement offers you the chance to inspire the next generation of researchers, at the same time as moving forward with your own projects. It’s an opportunity to give a 17-year-old the chance to discover what a career in STEM (science, technology, engineering or maths) might be like.

Work carried out by students often leads to published papers and has been used as the basis for grant applications.
In addition, supervising a student helps staff to develop their own teaching and mentoring skills. This is particularly useful for PhD students, postdoctoral researchers and staff looking to gain management experience.

For more information and to register as a project provider, please visit the Nuffield Foundation.


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Grab a Grant

Take a look at these research related funding opportunities.

Nuffield Foundation Grants for Research and Innovation

These support research, practical experiments or development work in areas such as children, families, education and the elderly.

Deadline for applications: 18 Apr 16

British Tinnitus Association Large Research Project Scheme

This supports projects which help to improve the lives of people with tinnitus.

Deadline for applications: 30 Apr 16

Viking Society for Northern Research Support Fund

The purpose of the fund is to assist in the development of the study of the literature, history, language and archaeology of early and medieval Scandinavia.

Deadline for applications: 01 May 16

Wellcome Trust People Awards

These support projects that are innovative and creative and engage the public with biomedical science or the history of medicine.

Deadline for applications: 20 May 16

British Psychological Society Sections Initiative Fund

This supports scientific initiatives that promote or advance psychology.

Deadline for applications: 01 Sep 16

For support during your application, please contact Research Development.


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Nuffield Foundation – 2 New Funding Schemes

Nuffield Foundation have launched two new funding schemes, which now are open to applications.

Economic Advantage and Disadvantage

This will fund projects that examine the distribution of all aspects of individual and household economic well-being, from poverty and benefits to wealth and savings. They are also interested in the factors that drive them, from labour markets to tax policies. Another priority will be work that looks at the causal role played by economic disadvantage and advantage on both economic and non-economic outcomes.

Finances of Ageing

This will fund projects that examine aspects of finance, economics, and transfers related to individual and population ageing. They are interested in the level and distribution of resources and outcomes, both across and within groups. They will also fund projects that examine the effects of policy changes or implementation, such as changing pension policy, changing policies on the finances of social care or other policies related to inter-generational transfers.

For support during your application or to discuss the Nuffield Foundation further, please contact Research Development.


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Nuffield Foundation launch new funding programmes in ‘Economic Advantage & Disadvantage’ and ‘Finances of Ageing’

Nuffield

The Nuffield Foundation  have launched two new funding programmes, Economic Advantage and Disadvantage, and Finances of Ageing. Both are open to applications for research and innovation projects.

Economic Advantage and Disadvantage will fund projects that examine the distribution of all aspects of individual and household economic well-being, from poverty and benefits to wealth and savings. We are also interested in the factors that drive them, from labour markets to tax policies. Another priority will be work that looks at the causal role played by economic disadvantage and advantage on both economic and non-economic outcomes.

Finances of Ageing will fund projects that examine aspects of finance, economics, and transfers related to individual and population ageing. We are interested in the level and distribution of resources and outcomes, both across and within groups. We will also fund projects that examine the effects of policy changes or implementation, such as changing pension policy, changing policies on the finances of social care or other policies related to inter-generational transfers.

Nuffield have previously funded some projects in these areas through our Open Door, which funds work outside ther main programmes. Trustees have now decided to establish distinct funding programmes, reflecting the growing importance of economic issues to their mission to improve social well-being. Each of the new programmes has several key themes. These themes are likely to be expanded over the next few months, so interested applicants should watch for new announcements.

 There are three rounds of applications each year and the application process is in two stages. Applicants submit a short outline application and those that meet the criteria are invited to submit a full application, which are subject to external peer review and considered at Trustees’ meetings. The next deadline for outline applications is 2 November 2015

Full criteria for both programmes are available in the how to apply section of their website.

In addition to Economic Advantage and Disadvantage and Finances of Ageing, the Foundation has five other programmes that fund research and innovation projects. These are: Children and Families, Early Years Education and Childcare, Education, Law in Society and Open Door

If you are interested in these opportunities then please contact your relevant Research Development Manager (and remember that Outline proposals still need proper costings and Faculty approval in the usual way).